Discover when and how to use correctly hay,lla and aya



The Royal Spanish Academy helps us to solve our doubts (Freepik)
The Royal Spanish Academy helps us to solve our doubts (Freepik)

The Spanish language is as varied as it is rich in words that sound the same but have different meanings. This group of words is called homophones. Examples in the language of Cervantes we have thousands such as voting and throwing away, baso and glass, you come and goods, among others.

But there are cases in which, if we are not clear about it, we can have a hard time and make more than one blunder when writing them, because by wanting to say one thing we end up saying something totally different.

A case that could make us fall into this fault is the way of writing there is, there is and there is.

It happens that almost all of us who speak Spanish pronounce them the same since the sound of the ‘ll’ and the ‘y’ practically no longer exists.

However, that is not an indication that they are written the same way in every situation. Each has a different meaning and let’s find out.

It can be used as a verb or a noun:

1. As a verb, it is the first or third person singular present subjunctive form of the verb to have. With this value it is used followed by a participle to form the present perfect of the subjunctive of the verb being conjugated (has seen, has looked, etc.), or as a verb of an impersonal sentence:

Examples:

I hope that Luis has approved.

He doesn’t think the boy dressed himself.

Maybe there’s something we can do.

If these expressions are changed in tense, then is the desired form of the verb haber will be replaced by another.

Examples:

He hoped that this time Luis had passed.

He didn’t think the boy had dressed himself.

Maybe there would be something we could do.

The etymology of this word indicates that it comes from the present of the Latin subjunctive habeam, habeas, habeatof the verb there will be (to have).

two. As a noun, it is feminine and refers to a type of tree.:

You have to prune the beech in the garden.

He sat down in the shade of a leafy beech tree.

It is always good to consult the Royal Spanish Academy to know how to write correctly.  (Freepik)
It is always good to consult the Royal Spanish Academy to know how to write correctly. (Freepik)

This is the form of the third person singular of the present indicative, or the second person (tú) of the singular of the imperative, of the verb to find(se), which means ‘meet)’:

examples:

I don’t know how he does it, but he always finds a perfect excuse not to go.

The headquarters of the organization is in Paris.

The flora is made up of different species.

Find the hypotenuse of the following right triangle.

As can be seen, in these cases the spelling ‘find’ can be replaced by the form find:

I don’t know how he does it, but he always finds a perfect excuse not to go.

The headquarters of the organization is located in Paris.

The flora is made up of different species.

Find the hypotenuse of the following right triangle.

Despite being a term that is not used in much of Latin America, the dictionary of the Royal Spanish Academy (RAE) tells us that aya refers to the ‘woman in charge of the care and education of children or young people in a house’:

Examples:

He still remembered the wise and caring nurse from his childhood.

The old nurse kept taking the children to the park.

Finally, and to complicate us a little more, these three words are plain words, but they should not be confused with the acute ‘there‘, which is a demonstrative adverb meaning ‘in or near that place’ or ‘at or near that place’:

Example:

There are many boxes up there; Don’t take the closet that far.

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